Here is the largest simulation of the Universe ever made, and it’s available to everyone

Here is the largest simulation of the Universe ever made, and it’s available to everyone
Here is the largest simulation of the Universe ever made, and it’s available to everyone

The researchers managed to get a simulated image of our Universe inserting complex data concerning the distribution of visible and “dark” matter into a special supercomputer. The result is this impressive cosmic web of unspeakable beauty.

To achieve such a milestone, scientists have employed considerable computing power: think that the model so detailed required the use of over 40,000 (forty thousand) cores and over 20 million hours to generate the simulation. In total, more than 3 petabytes of data were produced (which corresponds to approx 3000 TB or 3 million GB).

Fortunately, the researchers were able to generate highly compressed files in order to more comfortably cram the data without losing quality. We have therefore arrived at a final product and equally usable of “only” 100 TB of weight (for us mere mortals it may seem an out of scale value, but at least in this way it can be stored on large capacity hard drives).

The simulation was called Uchuu and will allow scientists and researchers to study the evolution of our Universe in depth. It is the largest and most detailed ever produced in living memory since it contains 2.1 trillion “particles” in a space of 9.6 billion light years.

Uchuu does not consider the formation of individual planets or stars so much, but focuses on the evolution of the cosmos from a point of view of distribution of matter and dark energy, which – combined together – make up about 85% of what “exists” in our Universe.

The dark matter web has quite high detail but it is freely downloadable from the official site for anyone who wants to analyze it at will (follow the procedures that will appear at this link). Obviously, in the annex there are also the scientific data obtained useful for one’s own evaluations, assuming that you know how to interpret them correctly.

Finally, below you can see two images: the first is an enlargement of the Uchuu simulation, while the second is the broader view of a large part of the Universe. If you want to know more, here you can find the study published on Oxford Academic.

Source

largest simulation Universe

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