Anti-Covid dogs to replace the tampon: also the Sassari Association in the national research

Anti-Covid dogs to replace the tampon: also the Sassari Association in the national research
Anti-Covid dogs to replace the tampon: also the Sassari Association in the national research

The first tests with the animals under training have given encouraging results

ANCONA. The fine nose of a dog trained to recognize the smell of a Covid-19 positive person, to replace a quick test or a molecular swab. The validation of the research promoted by the Polytechnic University of Marche in collaboration with the Vasta 3 Area of ​​Macerata would be a significant step forward for community screening – at the entrance of a school, stadium or cinema. , the Assl of Sassari, the University of Camerino and the canine associations Progetto Serena Onlus Asd, Simply dog ​​and Cluana Dog.

After a few weeks’ imprinting, in which the animal learns, on sweat samples of positive and negative, to perceive the difference by smell, the trainers teach him to sit down to indicate positivity. The first tests, with seven dogs including labrador retrievers, hounds and mestizos, are encouraging: today in action, during a demonstration at the Faculty of Medicine in Ancona, the labradors Aki (4 months) and Wave (12 months) they have found, sitting down, among the trainees-appearing those in possession of test tubes with Covid-positive samples. Animals perceive it as a game and are rewarded with prizes.

Before having the “value” of a buffer, explains the coordinator of the “C19-Screendog” project, Maria Rita Rippo, professor at Univpm, president of the degree course in nursing at Macerata, tests will be required on a thousand people and the comparison with the respective molecular test, to confirm its reliability. (Handle).

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AntiCovid dogs replace tampon Sassari Association national research

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