the Queen and royal family exempt from discrimination laws

the Queen and royal family exempt from discrimination laws
the Queen and royal family exempt from discrimination laws

The Queen of England and allto royal family would be exempt from the laws against racial and sexual discrimination. This was revealed by exclusive documents obtained by the Guardian as part of an investigation. According to the British newspaper, the clauses are still in force today. The documents also reveal that at least until the late 1960s “immigrants or foreigners of color” were excluded from official roles in Buckingham.

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The documents were discovered in the National Archives as part of a Guardian investigation into the royal family’s use of an obscure parliamentary procedure, called ‘Queen’s consent’, to secretly influence the content of British law. The royal family’s exemption from the prohibition of discrimination came into effect in the 1970s, shortly after the relevant laws were passed. In practice, the Guardian writes, for nearly 50 years it was impossible for people belonging to ethnic minorities who worked at the Palace to file a complaint if they felt they had been discriminated against. In a statement, Buckingham Palace did not deny that the queen was, or still is, exempt from the laws, however stating that the sovereign had, or has, a special procedure for accepting complaints relating to discrimination.


Last updated: Wednesday 2 June 2021, 17:33

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Queen royal family exempt discrimination laws

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