MEDIAN ITALY – Umbria Tomorrow

MEDIAN ITALY – Umbria Tomorrow
MEDIAN ITALY – Umbria Tomorrow
by Pierluigi Castellani

The problem of middle Italy is making a comeback in the political debate, recently re-launched from the pages of Il Messaggero by Prof. Luca Diotallevi, sociologist of the University of Roma Tre and from Terni by birth, then taken up by interventions by the presidents of the Lazio regions. and Umbria and by Giuseppe De Rita always on the pages of the Roman newspaper. In the political confrontation of our region this issue is not new. It was at the center of the political confrontation for the first time in the mid-nineties on the initiative of prof. Bruno Bracalente, then president of the Umbria region, as a stimulus to look beyond the narrow regional borders and also as a response to those who already posed the issue of macro-regions. After all, it is a fairly widespread belief that many problems cannot find a solution within the narrow regional boundary. Think above all of the road and railway infrastructures, the connection between the two Tyrrhenian and Adriatic seas and also the interconnection that tourism solicits between regions such as Lazio, Umbria, Marche and Tuscany rich in cultural heritage and museum systems. But to the sociological structure given by prof. Diotallevi, who sees the theme of middle Italy as an interconnection between metropolitan cities and satellite cities, gives a decidedly pragmatic turn Giuseppe De Rita in the interview with Il Messaggero on 11 April. “For example – says De Rita – there has never been a common cultural identity between the various parts of Central Italy … .. a very practical, extremely pragmatic approach is needed, and not an intellectual one and based on identifying discourses to this part of the country. Here are only a series of technical assessments to be made ”. And among these the founder of Censis mentions the connection between Civitavecchia -Orte – Falconara – Ancona, the enhancement of the port areas on the shores of the two Tyrrhenian and Adriatic seas precisely because until now mainly the development of Italy in a vertical and not even horizontally. Only with this realistic approach, according to De Rita, can we make sense of the issue of central Italy so that it is not crushed by a policy entirely oriented towards the development of the north of the country, attracted by central Europe, and overcoming the infrastructural gap and socio-economic from which the Italian South has been suffering for some time. De Rita’s vision may seem reductive, but it is certain that he tries to give substance to the problem of central Italy, which otherwise can slip onto eminently declamatory and sterile visionary terrain. It is also worth noting the importance that the topic is back to topicality because I believe that this is the best approach to remove the discourse on macro-regions from the purely institutional terrain when instead the regions, even small ones like Umbria, maintain their own raison d’être for that identity, which they have been able to consolidate and build, and which is missing in the wider space delimited by the shores of the Tyrrhenian and Adriatic. Even larger problems find better solutions if the particular vocations of the individual territories are not mortified.

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